There have been several changes to the language in the script of the CDSMP Peer Leader manual.

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See below for the changes:
Session:  2-6
Activity:  1: Feedback and Problem-Solving
Older manual:
Start with yourself as a model but make it very short.
Be sure one Leader models a plan that has been accomplished, and the other where a modification was made and then completed.
Manual as revised April 2015:
Start with yourself as a model but make it very short.
If one Leader encountered problems, he/she should model that a modification was made and then completed.

Session:   3
Activity:   2: Making Decisions
Older manual:
#8.     Instructions to Leaders: At the end of 10 minutes, reconvene the group and ask for 1 or 2 people to share:
1) the decision they were trying to make,
2) what they decided and
3) if that was what their gut told them.
Manual as revised April 2015:
Instructions to Leaders: At the end of 10 minutes, reconvene the group and ask for 1 or 2 people to share:
1) the decision they were trying to make
2) 3-4 of the “fors” and “againsts” (no need for scoring)
3) what they decided, and
4) if that was what their gut told them

Session: 5
Activity:  4: Making Informed Treatment Decisions
Older manual:
Say in your own words: If you use the Internet as a source of information about medications or other treatments, it is important to be cautious. Not everything found on the Internet is correct or even safe.
Therefore to help you find the more reliable sources look at the author or sponsor of the site and the URL address. Here are some examples:

Instructions to Leaders: Write these URLs on board or chartpad

  • http://patienteducation.stanford.edu
  • http://www.ncoa.org
  • http://www.nlm.hih.gov

Instructions to Leaders: Point to each address as you explain what follows:
Addresses ending in .edu, such as the address for the Stanford Patient Education Research Center, are educational institutions; .org, such as for the National Council on Aging are non-profit institutions.gov, such as for the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, are government institutions. These are generally more objective and reliable. Some.com sites can also be good, but because they come from commercial or for profit organizations, their information might be biased, as they may be trying to promote or sell their own products.

Manual as revised April 2015:
Say in your own words: If you use the Internet as a source of information about medications or other treatments, it is important to be cautious. Not everything found on the Internet is correct or even safe.
Therefore to help you find the more reliable sources look at the author or sponsor of the site and the URL address. Here are some examples:
Describe Chart 23a
Say in your own words: Websites from non-profits, government and educational institutions are usually reputable.  .com or .co or .biz sites are usually trying to sell or promote products or services, or they have advertisers on the site. You may want to consider these sites more cautiously. However, as in the case of WebMD, there are many reputable and valuable.com sites that are trustworthy and helpful, just as there can sometimes be incorrect information on some  .edu, .org or .gov sites.
Chart 23a should be added to the charts and a copy placed in your chart Appendix
Keep in mind that you need to makes these changes permanent in your Peer Leader manual. We will not be sending new manuals to peer leaders.
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